Troy Vanderhule tumblr
fastcodesign:

coffeeeee
fred-wilson:

I am loving the 3D printed espresso cups we got for the USV office on Shapeways (at Union Square Ventures)

fastcodesign:

coffeeeee

fred-wilson:

I am loving the 3D printed espresso cups we got for the USV office on Shapeways (at Union Square Ventures)

thenextweb:

Every two weeks, we’re following Chris Bradley in his Suitcase Startup mission, as he travels around his adopted home of London, armed only with a suitcase and a dream, meeting people who can help him launch his company, Publicate. Episode 2 is all about marketing. Chris is facing the same challenges that all startups face when trying to figure out how to market his business on a shoestring. He chats to word-of-mouth marketing agency 1000heads and Jess Williamson who handles marketing for UK accelerator Springboard, along with other London-based entrepreneurs, to find out what top tips they can share. (via Suitcase Startup episode 2: Marketing tips for brand new startups - The Next Web)

notcuddles:

collective-history:

Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows.
A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.
The knocker-up used a truncheon or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. In return, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.
There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was carried out by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols.
Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945.

I am delighted by this.

notcuddles:

collective-history:

Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows.

A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.

The knocker-up used a truncheon or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. In return, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.

There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was carried out by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols.

Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945.

I am delighted by this.

Pretty sure if this sign were in my house it would have a different list:
We live loudly, we love strong, we eat well, we pray lots, we move forward.

Pretty sure if this sign were in my house it would have a different list:

We live loudly, we love strong, we eat well, we pray lots, we move forward.